Remember me

Register  |   Lost password?


 

Econometrics Beat's Blog

Keynes and Econometrics

October 4, 2011 Comments (0)

Regular readers of this blog will know that I think it's important for students of econometrics to know something about the history of the discipline. So, let's pick a big-name economist at random, and see how he fitted into the overall scheme of things econometric. John Maynard Keynes completed his B.A. with first class honours at the University of Cambridge in 1904. His B.A. in mathematics, that is. Subsequently, he was placed twelfth Wrangler in the Mathematical Tripos of...

Making a Name for Yourself!

October 3, 2011 Comments (0)

So you want to make a name for yourself? One way for an up-and-coming young econometrician to do this would be to come up with a new estimator or test that everyone subsequently associates with your name. For example, the the Aitken estimator; the Durbin-Watson test; the Cochrane-Orcutt estimator; the Breusch-Pagan test; White's robust covariance matrix estimator, etc. This can be a bit risky - your new inferential procedure might not "catch on" as well as you hope it will. Worse yet, someone...

Estimating Models With "Under-Sized" Samples

September 28, 2011 Comments (0)

"....and there is no new thing under the sun."Ecclesiastes 1:9 (King James Bible) The first part of my career was spent at New Zealand's central bank (the Reserve Bank of N.Z.), where I was heavily involved in the construction and use of large-scale macroeconometric models. By the mid 1970's our models involved more than 100 equations (of which about 50 were structural relationships that had to be estimated; and the rest were accounting identities). The basic investigative estimation was...

Student's t-Test, Normality, and the Bootstrap

September 23, 2011 Comments (0)

Is Student's t-statistic still t-distributed if the data are non-normal? I addressed this question - in fact, an even more general question - in an earlier post titled "Being Normal is Optional!". There, I noted that the null distribution of any test statistic that is scale-invariant, will be the same if the data come from the elliptically symmetric family distributions, as if they come from the normal distribution. For econometricians, this has widespread relevance to our day-to-day work....

Are You in Need of Some Psychic Help?

September 21, 2011 Comments (0)

Occasionally I bid for items on ebaY. Sometimes I'm successful.  A few years ago I bought an item in this way, and it turned out that the seller lived here in my home town. I arranged to collect my purchase from his house, and in the course of the transaction he passed me his business card. Apart from his first name, and telephone number, the only other word on the front of the very colourful card was "PSYCHIC". I kid you not! Needless to say, I've kept his card. In my...

Communications With Economists

September 20, 2011 Comments (0)

There's an interesting looking online conference coming up in November - the 16th to 18th of November, specifically. This free conference is courtesy of the Journal of Economic Surveys, and their publisher, Wiley. The full title of the conference is "Communications With Economists: Current and Future Trends", and there will be three keynote videos; five papers with invited commentaries; workshops on academic publishing; a "reading room"; and lots of discussion. Students can...

R Meets Google

September 16, 2011 Comments (0)

Always on the lookout for innovative and free ways to implement data analysis, I was intrigued by a post on Andrew Gelman's blog yesterday, titled "More Data Tools Worth Using From Google". It referred to a 2009 post, "How to Use A Google Spreadsheet as Data in R" (recently updated here) on the Revolutions blog. The title of the post tells it all. Definitely worth knowing about! Free spreadsheet; free statistical software. What more could you want? But wait ...... there's more! In...

Micronumerosity

September 15, 2011 Comments (0)

In a much earlier post I took a jab at the excessive attention paid to the concept of "multicollinearity", historically, in econometrics text books. Art Goldberger (1930-2009) made numerous important contributions to econometrics, and modelling in the social sciences in general. He wrote several great texts, the earliest of which (Goldberger, 1964) was one of the very first to use the matrix notation that we now take as standard for the linear regression model. In one of ...

Econometrics and One-Way Streets

September 12, 2011 Comments (0)

It's a nice sunny day out there, so you decide to get on your bike and pedal down the street a couple of blocks to your favourite ice cream parlour. Great idea! Except that it's a one-way street and you're pedalling against the traffic. Fortunately, on this particular day, most people have already headed for the beach, there are very few cars that have to avoid you, and somehow you make it to your destination in one piece. Whew! Now, maybe your ears are suffering from some of the abuse you...

P-Values of Differences of P-Values of Differences of....

September 10, 2011 Comments (0)

© 2011, David E. Giles