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SUPPORTED BY
Nvidia
GPUs, Monte Carlo Simulation and Kooderive with Professor Mark Joshi - February 25-27th, London, UK - Further Information


Girls, Geeks, Twitter and Me.

Thu, 02 Feb 2012 03:07:31 GMT

When I get to work one of the first things that I do each morning is check out what’s happening on my Twitter timeline. One Thursday, a couple of weeks ago, one particular tweet caught my eye. It lead me to a great blog 'Girls can love computing; someone just needs to show them how' about the Manchester Girl Geeks. They are a group who are trying to encourage more girls and women to be interested in maths, science and technology. Being a girl myself, (OK, a woman really), and working for a mathematical software company, the article sparked a real interest.


A Girl Geek Tea Party

When I was at school, maths wasn’t my best subject, well actually and I’m going to be completely honest with you, it was my worst subject. My fear of all things mathematical started after being made to stand in front of the class reciting times tables. So it’s somewhat ironic that I found myself working at a numerical software company a few years ago, albeit in the marketing department. Had the 'Girl Geeks' been around in the 80s and had visited my school it might have made maths and science a bit more alluring for me. It’s a sad truth that girls are still way in the minority in choosing technical and science options at GCSE, A’level and degree level*. 

NAG want to help in some way to reverse this trend. I think I can speak for NAG in saying that we want to see more women achieving prominence in our organisation and in scientific computing in general.

Anyway, back to my reason for blogging. After reading about the great work that Manchester Girl Geeks are involved in we decided to support them by way of sponsorship. I’m writing today to raise awareness of their mission as we feel it’s really worthwhile. We have some ideas for other ways in which NAG can assist their goals in the future.

What other way’s can we as an organisation make a positive difference?

*around 16% in 2009 of students in undergraduate computer science degrees are female.

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