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Modelling China's Credit System with Complex Network Theory for Systematic Credit Risk Control. (arXiv:1812.01341v1 [q-fin.RM])

Tue, 04 Dec 2018 19:48:44 GMT

The insufficient understanding of the credit network structure was recognized
as a key factor for regulators' underestimation of the destructive systematic
risk during the financial crisis that started in 2007. The existing credit
network research either took a macro perspective to clarify the topological
properties of financial systems at a descriptive level or analyzed the risk
transmission path and characteristics of individual entities with much
pre-assumptions of the network. Here, we used the theory of complex network to
model China's credit system from 2000 to 2014 based on actual financial data. A
bipartite financial institution-firm network and its projected sub-networks
were constructed for an integrated analysis from both macro and micro
perspectives, and the relationship between typological properties and
systematic credit risk control was also explored. The typological analysis of
the networks suggested that the financial institutions and firms were highly
but asymmetrically connected, and the credit network structure made local
idiosyncratic shocks possible to proliferate through the whole economy. In
addition, the Chinese credit market was still dominated by state-owned
financial institutions with firms competing fiercely for financial resources in
the past fifteen years. Furthermore, the credit risk score (CRS) was introduced
by simulation to identify the systematically important vertices in terms of
systematic risk control. The results indicated that the vertices with more
access to the credit market or less likelihood to be a bridge in the network
were the ones with higher systematically importance. The empirical results from
this study would provide specific policy suggestions to financial regulators on
supervisory approaches and optimizing the allocation of regulatory resources to
enhance the robustness of credit systems in China and in other countries.